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of social morality, at if not ofa Buddhist Abbot, he said: "In the present hostilities into which Japan

least, Confucianism, or more accurately, Neo-Confucianism, had become Zen dogma. With the coming of the Meiji Restoration in 1868 and the elimination of the feudal system, however, devotion to one's lord became an anachronism. The temple school system, too, was abolished by the new government, and in its

With the coming of the Meiji Restoration in 1868 and the elimination of the feudal system, however, devotion to one's lord became an anachronism. The temple school system, too, was abolished by the new government, and in its place a state-supported public school system was established. As a result, Zen, and the other traditional Buddhist sects which had, in general, played a similar role vis-a-vis feudal authority, were thrown into confusion. The emergence of Shinto as a state religion and the repressive governmental measures directed towards Buddhism served to worsen the situation.