chapter
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of a significant

Zen (or Buddhist) socialist movement in Japan. The most that can be said is that the potential does exist. In the meantime, employee training programs will con- tinue to be the main "social activity" of the majority of Japanese Zen Buddhist monasteries. In fact, in the short run these programs will undoubtedly be ex- panded. As the worldwide crisis of capitalism deepens, the Japanese corporate

It is, of course, still much too early to talk about the existence of a significant Zen (or Buddhist) socialist movement in Japan. The most that can be said is that the potential does exist. In the meantime, employee training programs will continue to be the main "social activity" of the majority of Japanese Zen Buddhist monasteries. In fact, in the short run these programs will undoubtedly be expanded. As the worldwide crisis of capitalism deepens, the Japanese corporate need for a disciplined and subservient work force will become greater than ever before. However, given the growing strength of both the external and internal forces opposed to "Japan, Inc." (and its American and European allies), there is no more reason to believe that contemporary Japanese Zen leaders will, ultimately, be any more successful in maintaining the corporate state than their predecessors were in maintaining the feudal and fascist regimes of the past.