chapter
4 Pages

of a Dying Emperor, Tomino

has suffered the consequences of taking a firm political stand on volatile issues. Shortly after he was elected mayor on his pledge to halt the Ikego Housing Project, police authorities thought it necessary to station enough policemen to surround the mayor's home for three months to protect him and his family from possible attacks by members of right-wing groups.2 Tomino was not especially

Mayor Tomino is a controversial figure in Japan. Along the same lines of Chibana Shoichi, Nakaya Yasuko, and Motoshima Hitoshi, voices of dissent chronicled by Norma Field in her In the Realm of a Dying Emperor, I Tomino has suffered the consequences of taking a firm political stand on volatile issues. Shortly after he was elected mayor on his pledge to halt the Ikego Housing Project, police authorities thought it necessary to station enough policemen to surround the mayor's home for three months to protect him and his family from possible attacks by members of right-wing groups.2 Tomino was not especially frightened by the right-wing groups which vigorously protested his stance on the Ikego Housing Project. It was the support of right-wing groups such as the Issuikaithat that disturbed Tomino. Members of Issuikai insisted that it was outmgeous for foreign troops to be stationed on the Emperor's land, and wished Tomino the best of luck in stopping the housing project. In 1988 Tomino participated in a televised debate with fifteen individuals, including rightwing activist Nomura Shosuke, on the meaning of the Showa emperor. The two stand ideologically apart on the emperor system, but after the debate Nomura slapped Tomino on the back and encouraged him in his efforts to stop the housing project. 3 While sometimes drawing support from surprising and unwelcome quarters, Tomino's policies made him a figure of controversy throughout his eight years in office.