chapter
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labor-a unification that had seemed within reach in midwinter. By preventing of the General Strike, no doubt because a socialist premier had succeeded

the unification of the unions, the SCAP doomed as well the fight to make industrial unions the basic means for worker organization in Japan. Although the national federations affiliated with Sambetsu held their own for a time after the failure Yoshida, big business had in fact regained the initiative. This would become

Big business and government leaders had already shown their determination not to knuckle under to the national federations of the unions, but to make the enterprise the fundamental unit for bargaining with organized labor. In order to counter this effort the leftist majority in the labor movement consolidated behind Sambetsu (Zen Nihon Sangyobetsu Rodo Kumiai Kaigi, Congress of Industrial Unions), and mounted an offensive in the second half of 1946 to establish the power of national union federations built upon a federation of subordinate enterprise locals. When the struggle escalated into an attempt to topple the vehemently anti-labor Yoshida government, SCAP once again stepped in. SCAP's prohibition of the 1 February 1947 General Strike was a major defeat that destroyed the chance for a unification of Sambetsu and Sodomei (Nihon Rodo Kumiai SOdomei, Japan Federation of Labor) into one national organization for labor-a unification that had seemed within reach in midwinter. By preventing the unification of the unions, the SCAP doomed as well the fight to make industrial unions the basic means for worker organization in Japan. Although the national federations affiliated with Sambetsu held their own for a time after the failure of the General Strike, no doubt because a socialist premier had succeeded Yoshida, big business had in fact regained the initiative. This would become clear in early 1948.