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of education, and intrusive local

police surveillance (the police box system). In this, it parallels the intense drive of the capitalist enterprise to achieve total hegemony over its work force. The "administrative reform" pressed by the LOP was similarly infused with the premise of hierarchical control, as can be seen most clearly in proposals for reform of education and Constitutional revision. Indeed, a common drive for

The vision of corporate society sprang from the actual penetration of corporate values into Japan's economic, political, social, and cultural life. By the 1980s, corporate supremacy had gone so far that the national agenda did look to be identical with the business agenda. Certainly, there were strong forces within the elite other than business that had long wanted to move the country towards a corporate order, above all the career bureaucrats at the top. No less than the imperial bureaucracy before World War II, the postwar bureaucracy has seen its primary goal to be the regulation of Japan as a well-ordered society-by means of the family register, tight central regulation of education, and intrusive local police surveillance (the police box system). In this, it parallels the intense drive of the capitalist enterprise to achieve total hegemony over its work force. The "administrative reform" pressed by the LOP was similarly infused with the premise of hierarchical control, as can be seen most clearly in proposals for reform of education and Constitutional revision. Indeed, a common drive for hierarchical control and cultural hegemony has helped weld together the business and bureaucratic leaders with the LOP into an elite.