chapter
14 Pages

Introduction

BySALLY MACARTHUR, JUDY LOCHHEAD

The term 'applied aesthetics' itself suggests this alternate approach. Within the philosophical domain, aesthetics is focused on a philosophy of art and on the nature of beauty and taste. As Deleuze and Guattari maintain, thinking the world assumes three distinct modes, as philosophy, science and art. All three modes of thinking struggle with chaos but in differing ways: philosophy produces concepts, science produces function and art produces sensations. Composers work with sounds that have timbre, pitch, duration, dynamics and articulation, these parameters of sound constituting the materials of musical creation. The sensations of music have some affinities with the sensations of painting as Deleuze articulated them and the terms employed to evoke these sensations are familiar, playing a role in our everyday address of musical experience. Daniel Smith disavowed Deleuze's book on the paintings of Francis Bacon as any form of art criticism. There seems to be a fundamental discomfort about using words as a means of engaging art.