chapter  22
11 Pages

Power and accountability

Life after death row in the United States
WithKimberly J. Cook, Saundra D. Westervelt

This chapter examines applications of power and accountability as experienced by exonerated death row survivors in the United States. It also examines the extensive challenges to re-entry faced by exonerees: finding employment; searching for a place to live; rebuilding family and friend relationships; and learning to cope with the social and psychological impact of life on death row. The chapter argues that wrongful convictions establish a relationship to the state that is potentially lethal and perpetual; once an exoneration occurs, the battle against the state is not over. It explains some of the consequences of wrongful capital convictions, through the voices of our research participants. The chapter also explains some of the consequences of wrongful capital convictions, through the voices of our research participants. It argues that exonerated death row survivors are, victims of state harm. The system has failed to protect the human rights of the accused, resulting in thousands of people wrongfully convicted and hundreds condemned to death.