chapter  1
Neoliberalism, moral economy and fraud
ByDAVID WHYTE, JÖRG WIEGRATZ
Pages 16

This chapter examines supermarket growth in the UK. One of the largest corporate retailers in the world, from 2013 it began slipping behind its global competitors and down the UKs FTSE 100 share index. The process of recovering what is actually taking place in such hybrid spaces is, however, difficult and requires a shift of analytical focus. The course on which UK supermarkets have found themselves was not predetermined but contingent on many factors, including political interventions. In 2006 Office for Fair Trading (OFT), the Competition Commission reported again, this time explicitly addressing anti-competitive practice in local markets with the aim of strengthening the earlier Code of Practice. Supermarkets parasitism is not accidental and it did not take place behind decision-makers backs. Genealogical investigations are useful here as they enable us to make sense of the changing character of the moral claims made in relation to contemporary economic affairs, as with supermarket growth and the trajectories it has followed.