chapter  18
16 Pages

Decolonising tourism mobilities? Planning research within a First Nations community in Northern Canada

WithBRYAN S. R. GRIMWOOD, LAUREN J. KING, ALLISON P. HOLMES,

The tundra thunders underfoot when muskoxen bolt across the terrain. Clad in thick wool coats, a strong musky odour during rut, and long curved horns, these large ancient-looking members of the Bovidae family have adapted and evolved in habitat primarily located in Arctic Canada and Greenland. Like other herd species, muskoxen’s primary defence mechanism when they sense danger is to run. They are unique, however, in that after a few hundred metres they stop and circle up, the bulkier males stationed on the outside to protect the smaller females and calves on the inside. Against wolves and other historic predators, this response has proven successful in terms of maintaining herd health and integrity. But against humans with guns, muskoxen are, emblematically, sitting ducks.