chapter
Introduction
ByRONDA ARAB, MICHELLE M. DOWD, ADAM ZUCKER
Pages 12

Anatomist Helkiah Crooke elaborates upon Aquinas's Peripatetic axiom in describing the passage of sensory data to the intellect. The external senses convey information to "the Tribunal of the internal sense" which would be "imperfect and unprofitable" without such knowledge: For if we conceive anything in our minds, and nourish that conceit by discourse, againe and againe ventilating it to and fro. Thus all things had their original from outward senses; for neither colours, odours, nor savours be known, neither could the Internal sense discourse of sounds, or of any Tactile qualities without the message as it were, and information of the outward senses, by which the Images of thinges are imprinted in it. Specifically, Crooke deploys the word discourse, two senses of which are here tidily collapsed: that of thinking and that of speech. Hence the chapter celebrates the protean unfixity of Lingua as it traces the materialization of the complex performativity of the tongue in the early modern period.