chapter  10
Research and remembrance in a rural community: a step toward ethical learning
ByLINDA FARR DARLING
Pages 15

The woman’s voice, Karen’s, is laced with a soft Russian accent. Between phrases she pauses as if to make certain each word is right. Karen looks to be in her late sixties with warm brown eyes, and calloused hands that lie quietly on her lap. She swallows once, then looks out at her interviewer, who sits holding a fl ip video camera. Her question hangs in the air. The interviewer shifts a little as if searching for a comfortable position. Karen signals with a wave that she has fi nished speaking and the camera is turned off. An electronic hum is now the only sound in the room.