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Commentary on ‘Balancing basic and applied research with national needs in PET’

ByBUXIN HAN

Psychology can be both culturally specifi c and universal, with clinical or other applied branches being more biased to the effects of culture. For example, Freud’s psychoanalysis was infl uenced by the Jewish religious doctrine (Kabbalah) (Langman, 1997) and Vygotsky proposed social cultural development theory from his Jewish background growing up (Kotik-Friedgut and Friedgut, 2008). Such culturally specifi c but creative thoughts have contributed so much to dual track psychology, that Jewish psychologists have held 39 per cent of the 99 eminent psychologist positions in the twentieth century (Haggbloom et al., 2002; www.jinfo.org/psychology.html).