chapter  1
13 Pages

Introduction

ByKATHERINE BERRY, ADAM N. DANQUAH, DAVID WALLIN

In the ¿ fty years since its inception, John Bowlby’s attachment theory has become ‘the most powerful contemporary account of social and emotional development available to science’ (Steele 2002: 518). Although the theory’s inÀ uence has been most obvious in developmental psychology, it was originally conceived in a clinical context and the last 20 years have witnessed a dramatic surge of interest in attachment from within the mental health ¿ eld (Fonagy 2001; Holmes 2001; Obegi and Berant 2009; Wallin 2007). A growing body of theory and research now links attachment to adult psychopathology and interpersonal problems. Meanwhile there is increasing consensus that attachment theory is well placed to provide the overarching framework for interventions in mental health (see Obegi and Berant 2009).