chapter  10
Nutritional strategies to reduce emissions from waste in pig production Phung Lê Đình, Hue University of Agriculture and Forestry, University and Research, The Netherlands
ByHue University, Vietnam; and André J. A. Aarnink, Wageningen
Pages 22

Nutritional strategies to reduce emissions from waste in pig production Phung Lê Đình, Hue University of Agriculture and Forestry, Hue University, Vietnam; and André J. A. Aarnink, Wageningen University and Research, The Netherlands

1 Introduction

2 Nutrition and ammonia emissions

3 Nutrition and odour emissions

4 Nutrition and greenhouse gas emissions

5 Effectiveness of dietary solutions for reduction of gaseous emissions

6 Conclusion

7 Future trends

8 Where to look for further information

9 References

In various parts of the world, pig production is highly concentrated. Pigs are reared in vast numbers in some parts of Europe, some parts of Northern and Southern America and in a large part of Southeast Asia (Fig. 1). Pig production brings significant benefits to many households all over the world, especially to smallholders in Southeast Asia. There is a tendency, however, for farm sizes to expand and the number of individual farms to decrease. In the Netherlands, for instance, the number of farms with pigs has decreased from 271 000 in 1950 to 5000 in 2016, while at the same time pig meat production has increased from 236 to 1453 million kg (CBS, 2017). In Southeast Asia there has been a rapid development in pig production: pig farms have become more specialized and have grown in size, especially around large cities (Huynh et al., 2008).