chapter  18
5 Pages

Differences in C-Reactive Protein (CRP) between depression levels in ischaemic stroke patients

WithS.N. Lubis, W.H. Lubis, I. Nasution

You have download access for this chapter.

PDF 0.11MB

Post-Stroke Depression (PSD), characterised by mood abnormality, selfblame, and grief, is diagnosed in 40-72% of stroke patients. It can inhibit the healing of stroke patients and increase mortality rate. The aim is to investigate the difference in C-Reactive Protein (CRP) value between depression levels in ischaemic stroke patients. Forty-five consecutive ischaemic stroke patients at Adam Malik and affiliated hospitals had their CRP values assessed, and 15 days later, the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) questionnaire was used to classify their depression levels. 51.1% of the PSD patients were men aged 60.71 ± 10.3 years old, and 64.4% were smokers and high school graduates. The mean CRP level in post-stroke patients with mild depression was 0.7 mg/dl, with moderate depression was 3 mg/dl, and with major depression was 9.4 mg/dl. There were significant differences in CRP value between depression levels in ischaemic stroke patients (p = 0.001). The highest CRP level occurred in cases of severe depression, followed by moderate depression, and then mild depression.