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comparatist for a number of reasons: (a) the patrimony is particularly well developed in French law as a key institutional structure; (b) the idea of a universitas rerum can be found to underpin the Anglo-American trust; (c) the New Dutch Code has specifically incorporated the notion of patrimony as part of its system: Book III is concerned only with patrimonial rights and thus one finds in a single book all things, both corporeal and incorporeal; (d) the idea of a universitas rerum is fundamental to succession law.
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Auld LJ: This appeal concerns the collision of two familiar notions of English law: ‘finders keepers’ and that an owner or lawful possessor of land owns all that is in or attached to it. More particularly, it raises two questions. (1) Who, as between an owner or lawful possessor of land and a finder of an article in or attached to the land, is entitled to the article? (2) How is the answer to (1) affected by, or applied, when the land is public open space?