ABSTRACT

This collection offers the fruits of a stimulating workshop that sought to bridge the fraught relationship which sometimes continues between anthropologists and indigenous/native/aboriginal scholars, despite areas of overlapping interest. Participants from around the world share their views and opinions on subjects ranging from ideas for reconciliation, the question of what might constitute a universal "science," indigenous heritage, postcolonial museology, the boundaries of the term "indigeneity," different senses as ways of knowing, and the very issue of writing as a method of dissemination that divides and excludes readers from different backgrounds. This book represents a landmark step in the process of replacing bridges with more equal patterns of intercultural cooperation and communication.

chapter |18 pages

Introduction

ByJOY HENDRY, LAARA FITZNOR

part |2 pages

PART I History of the Divergence and Some Ideas for Reconciliation

chapter 7|13 pages

Social Anthropology, Nativeness and Basque Studies

ByKEPA FERNÁNDEZ DE LARRINOA

part |2 pages

PART II Science and Epistemology

chapter 8|9 pages

Indigenous Science and Sustainable Community Development

ByGREGORY A. CAJETE

chapter 9|10 pages

Traditional Knowledge and Western Science

ByF. DAVID PEAT

part |2 pages

PART III Indigenous Heritage and Post-Colonial Museology

part |2 pages

PART IV The Senses as a Way of Knowing and Communicating

chapter 16|9 pages

Uncovering the Sensory Experience

ByREBECCA KIDDLE

chapter 17|18 pages

Moko Māori: An Understanding of Pain

ByNGAHUIA TE AWEKOTUKU

chapter 18|10 pages

Sounding Out Indigenous Knowledge in Okinawa

ByRUPERT COX, KOZO HIRAMATSU

chapter 19|15 pages

Cultures, Senses and the Design of Public Space

ByIAN BENTLEY, LAM LEI BONNIE KWOK AND REGINA MAPUA LIM

part |2 pages

PART V Writing and Other Forms of Dissemination