ABSTRACT

There is a considerable gap between the science of conservation biology and the design and execution of biodiversity conservation projects in the field. Science is often failing to inform the practice of conservation, which remains largely experience-based. The main reason is the poor accessibility of evidence on the effectiveness of different interventions. This is the basis for this book adopting an 'evidence-based approach', modelled on the systematic reviews used in health sciences and now being applied to many policy arenas.

Evidence-based Conservation brings together a series of case studies, written by field practitioners, that provides the evidence-base for evaluating how effective conservation and poverty alleviation strategies can be better implemented. A series of systematic reviews uses experiences and data from fifteen integrated conservation and development projects conducted in the Lower Mekong region, specifically in Vietnam, Laos and Cambodia. They provide wide-ranging overviews of the effectiveness of protected areas and how innovative tools and methods for monitoring and evaluation can be utilised for more effective outcomes. Results are in the form of management and policy recommendations, based on the quality of evidence and the cost-utility of the intervention. By bridging the gap between field practice and conservation, the analysis should lead to more effective integrated conservation and development interventions. The book represents one of the first attempts to apply the evidence-based approach to conservation and development.

part |2 pages

PART 1 Introduction

chapter 1|12 pages

PART 2

ByTERRY C.H. SUNDERLAND, JEFFREY A. SAYER

part |2 pages

PART 2.1 Experiences from the field: lessons learned in the implementation of integrated conservation and development projects: Vietnam

chapter 2|12 pages

Cat Tien National Park

ByNGUYEN HUYNH THUAT AND YEN HOANG MAI

chapter 3|10 pages

Song Thanh Nature Reserve

ByTU VAN KHANH AND YEN HOANG MAI

chapter 4|11 pages

Bach Ma National Park

ByLÊ QUÝ MINH

chapter 5|11 pages

Tam Dao National Park

ByDUONG VAN HUNG

chapter 6|10 pages

Hoang Lien – Van Ban Nature Reserve

ByHOANG VAN LAM AND YEN HOANG MAI

part |2 pages

PART 2.2 Experiences from the field: lessons learned in the implementation of integrated conservation and development projects: Laos

chapter 7|18 pages

Nam Et-Phou Louey National Protected Area

ByARLYNE JOHNSON

chapter 8|19 pages

Nam Kading National Protected Area

ByCHRIS HALLAM, MICHAEL HEDEMARK

chapter 9|15 pages

Nakai-Nam Theun National Protected Area

ByWILLIAM ROBICHAUD

chapter 10|18 pages

The Xe Pian-Dong Hua Sao-Dong Ampham Biodiversity Conservation Corridor

ByROBERT MCWILLIAM, GABRIELLA ROSCHER

part |2 pages

PART 2.3 Experiences from the field: lessons learned in the implementation of integrated conservation and development projects: Cambodia

chapter 12|30 pages

Seima Protection Forest

ByTOM D. EVANS, HANNAH J. O’KELLY, MEN SORIYUN,

chapter 13|15 pages

Central Cardamom Conservation Program

chapter 14|14 pages

Phnom Samkos Wildlife Sanctuary

ByKHOU EANG HOURT

chapter 15|9 pages

Virachey National Park

ByKHEM RONG DEN AND CHOU SOPHARK

part |2 pages

PART 3 in the Lower Mekong: possibilities, prospects and policy

chapter 17|21 pages

Organizational strategies for reconciling forest conservation and livelihood goals in interventions

ByLUKE D. PREECE, BARBARA HERRERO-CANGAS,

chapter 18|36 pages

A review of conservation area governance in Cambodia, Laos and Vietnam

ByYEN HOANG MAI, LUKE D. PREECE, NGUYEN NGHIA LAN

chapter 19|23 pages

An analysis of conservation and development trade-offs at the Cat Tien National Park, Vietnam

ByZACHARY R. ANDERSON, PAUL D. HIRSCH

chapter 21|18 pages

Quantifying threats to forests in the Lower Mekong and assessing responses

ByLUKE D. PREECE, BARBARA HERRERO-CANGAS,

chapter 22|17 pages

Local perspectives on payments for environmental services

ByLISA PETHERAM, BRUCE M. CAMPBELL

part |2 pages

PART 4 Conclusions and recommendations

chapter 25|9 pages

Lessons learned from conservation and development interventions in the Lower Mekong

ByTERRY C.H. SUNDERLAND, JEFFREY A. SAYER AND