ABSTRACT

This book is a systematic and historical exploration of the philosophical significance of grammar. In the first half of the twentieth century, and in particular in the writings of Frege, Husserl, Russell, Carnap and Wittgenstein, there was sustained philosophical reflection on the nature of grammar, and on the relevance of grammar to metaphysics, logic and science.

chapter |27 pages

Introduction: Proposition and world

ByRICHARD GASKIN

chapter 1|26 pages

Frege and the grammar of truth

ByRICHARD MENDELSOHN

chapter 4|26 pages

Grammar, ontology, and truth in Russell and Bradley

BySTEWART CANDLISH

chapter 5|21 pages

A few more remarks on logical form

ByALEX OLIVER

chapter 6|19 pages

Logical syntax in the Tractatus

ByIAN PROOPS

chapter 7|17 pages

Wittgenstein on grammar, meaning, and essence

ByBEDE RUNDLE

chapter 8|19 pages

Nonsense and necessity in Wittgenstein’s mature philosophy

ByRICHARD GASKIN

chapter 9|20 pages

Carnap’s logical syntax

chapter 10|15 pages

Heidegger and the grammar of being

ByGRAHAM PRIEST