ABSTRACT

How can a theory of the self be used to understand the psychotherapeutic process?

The basic assumption of the 'dialogical self' is that there is no centralised 'headquarter' in the mind, but that the internal self is made up of a number of different 'characters'. Interpersonal relationships, from infancy onwards, become internalised - these internalised relationships then influence relationships during life.

The Dialogical Self in Psychotherapy is divided into four clear and accessible sections, which explore:

* theoretical and historical assumptions of the dialogical self from different angles: psychological, developmental and neurobiological
* the relationships between Dialogical Self Therapy and the authors' own theoretical perspectives
* treatment of clients suffering from severe disorders
* method and research.

The Dialogical Self in Psychotherapy
gathers together psychotherapists from divergent origins to explore current thinking in the field: cognitive, constructivist, process-experiential, narrative, psychodynamic, psychodramatic, humanistic, and cognitive analytic. This innovative book brings together inter- and intra-subjective dialogue and clearly demonstrates how they are incorporated into the therapeutic process.

chapter |10 pages

The dialogical self in psychotherapy

ByHUBERT J.M. HERMANS AND GIANCARLO DIMAGGIO

part |2 pages

Part I General theory

chapter 1|16 pages

The dialogical self

Between exchange and power
ByHUBERT J.M. HERMANS

chapter 2|14 pages

Developmental origins of the dialogical self: some significant moments

Some significant moments Starting points
ByMARIE-CÉCILE BERTAU

chapter 3|17 pages

Toward a neuropsychological model of internal dialogue

Implications for theory and clinical practice
ByMARC D. LEWIS, REBECCA TODD

chapter 4|15 pages

Encountering self–otherness

‘I–I’ and ‘I–Me’ modes of self-relating
ByMICK COOPER

part |2 pages

Part II Theory and clinical practice

chapter 5|14 pages

Self-multiplicity and narrative expression in psychotherapy

ByLYNNE ANGUS AND JOHN McLEOD

chapter 6|17 pages

Encounters between internal voices generate emotion

An elaboration of the assimilation model
ByWILLIAM B. STILES, KATERINE OSATUKE, MEREDITH J. GLICK

chapter 7|16 pages

From discord to dialogue

Internal voices and the reorganization of the self in process-experiential therapy
ByWILLIAM J. WHELTON, LESLIE S. GREENBERG

chapter 8|14 pages

The dialogical construction of coalitions in a personal position repertoire

ByHUBERT J.M. HERMANS AND ELS HERMANS-JANSEN

chapter 9|14 pages

Standing in the spaces

The multiplicity of self and the psychoanalytic relationship
ByPHILIP M. BROMBERG

chapter 10|19 pages

The psychodramatic ‘social atom method’ with children

A developing dialogical self in dialectic action
ByLENI M.F. VERHOFSTADT-DENÈVE, LET DILLEN, DENIS HELSKENS

part |2 pages

Part III Reconstructing dialogical processes in severely affected patients

chapter 11|17 pages

Performing the self:

Therapeutic enactment and the narrative integration of traumatic loss
ByROBERT A. NEIMEYER AND MARLA BUCHANAN-ARVAY

chapter 12|15 pages

Strategies for the treatment of dialogical dysfunctions

Impoverished dialogues
ByGIANCARLO DIMAGGIO, GIAMPAOLO SALVATORE, DARIO

chapter 13|15 pages

Dialogical transformation in the psychotherapy of schizophrenia

ByPAUL H. LYSAKER, JOHN T. LYSAKER

chapter 14|15 pages

A dialogical approach to patients with personality disorders

ByANTONIO SEMERARI, ANTONINO CARCIONE, GIANCARLO

part |2 pages

Part IV Methodological issues in the psychotherapeutic process

chapter 15|18 pages

Hearing voices

Methodological issues in measuring internal multiplicity
ByKATERINE OSATUKE, MICHAEL A. GRAY, MEREDITH J. GLICK

chapter 16|16 pages

Dialogical sequence analysis

ByMIKAEL LEIMAN