ABSTRACT

This book focuses on the key issues that affect military families when soldiers are deployed overseas, focusing on the support given to military personnel and families before, during and after missions.

Today’s postmodern armies are expected to provide social-psychological support both to their personnel in military operations abroad and to their families at home. Since the end of the Cold War and even more so after 9/11, separations between military personnel and their families have become more frequent as there has been a multitude of missions carried out by multinational task forces all over the world. The book focuses on three central questions affecting military families. First, how do changing missions and tasks of the military affect soldiers and families? Second, what is the effect of deployments on the ones left behind? Third, what is the national structure of family support systems and its evolution?

The book employs a multidisciplinary approach, with contributions from psychology, sociology, history, anthropology and others. In addition, it covers all the services, Army, Navy/Marines, Air Force, spanning a wide range of countries, including UK, USA, Belgium, Turkey, Australia and Japan. At the same time it takes a multitude of perspectives such as the theoretical, empirical, reflective, life events (narrative) approach, national and the global, and uses approaches from different disciplines and perspectives, combining them to produce a volume that enhances our knowledge and understanding of military families.

This book will be of much interest to students of military studies, sociology, war and conflict studies and IR/political science in general.

 

part |2 pages

PART I Military organizations and families in transition

chapter 1|19 pages

Introduction

ByRENÉ MOELKER, MANON ANDRES, GARY BOWEN

part |2 pages

PART II Military families under stress

chapter 6|20 pages

The emotional cycle of deployment

ByMAREN TOMFORDE

chapter 9|16 pages

Reintegration, reconciliation, and relationship quality

ByMANON ANDRES, KARIN DE ANGELIS, AND DAVID MCCONE

chapter 11|14 pages

Children and deployment: A cross-country comparison

ByMANON ANDRES, JULIE COULTHARD

part |2 pages

PART III National social-psychological family support

chapter 12|17 pages

Missions alike and unlike: Military family support in war and peace

ByJOCELYN BARTONE

chapter 13|17 pages

Community capacity and the psychological well-being of married U.S. Air Force members

ByGARY BOWEN, JAMES MARTIN, JAY MANCINI, DANIELLE SWICK

chapter 15|19 pages

How do military families cope with multiple deployments abroad of loved ones? The case of Belgium

ByPHILIPPE MANIGART, VALERIAN LECOQ, AND SALVATORE LO BUE

chapter 17|9 pages

Family support systems in the Turkish military

ByKADIR VAROGLU, YAVUZ ERCIL, UNSAL SIGRI

chapter 19|17 pages

Family support and the Japan Self-Defense Forces: Challenges and developing new programs

ByHITOSHI KAWANO, ATSUKO FUKUURA

chapter 20|12 pages

Epilogue

ByMANON ANDRES, GARY BOWEN, PHILIPPE MANIGART