ABSTRACT

This book examines the role played by political communications, including media of all kinds - journalism, television, and film - in defining and shaping identity in Greater China; China, Hong Kong, Taiwan and overseas Chinese. In the context of increasing cross-border interactions of people, investment and commercial products between the component parts of greater China, the book explores the idea that identity, rather than nation-states or political entities, may be the key factor in achieving further integration in Greater China. The book focuses on the ways in which identity is communicated, and shows how communication of identity within and between the component parts of greater China plays a central role in bringing about integration.

chapter 1|9 pages

Introduction

ByGARY D.RAWNSLEY AND MING-YEH T.RAWNSLEY

chapter 2|29 pages

The meaning and significance of Greater China

ByJOHN F. COPPER

part |2 pages

Part I The People’s Republic of China

chapter 3|21 pages

Peddling party ideology for a profit

chapter 4|21 pages

Modern political communication in China

ByNEIL RENWICK, QING CAO

chapter 5|18 pages

What Chinese journalists believe about journalism

ByHUGO DE BURGH

part |2 pages

Part II Taiwan

chapter 7|23 pages

Gender and party politics

chapter 8|20 pages

Communication of identities in Taiwan

part |2 pages

Part III Hong Kong

chapter 9|21 pages

The media in Hong Kong

chapter 11|22 pages

Directing Hong Kong

part |2 pages

Part IV The overseas Chinese

chapter 12|22 pages

Is there a British Chinese public sphere?

ByDAVID PARKER

chapter 13|14 pages

Children, media and the public sphere in Chinese Australia

ByYINGCHI CHU, STEPHANIE HEMELRYK DONALD AND ANDREA WITCOMB

chapter 14|16 pages

Talking about Jet Li

part |2 pages

Conclusion

chapter 15|24 pages

Greater China, globalisation and emancipation

ByNEIL RENWICK