ABSTRACT

First published in 1997. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company.

chapter |18 pages

INTRODUCTION

Environmental value and the scope of economics
ByJohn Foster

part |2 pages

Part I ECONOMICS AND ENVIRONMENTAL POLICY

chapter 1|11 pages

THE ENVIRONMENTAL ‘VALUATION’ CONTROVERSY

Observations on its recent history and significance
ByRobin Grove-White

chapter 2|16 pages

VALUES AND PREFERENCES IN NEO-CLASSICAL ENVIRONMENTAL ECONOMICS

ByRussell Keat

chapter 3|17 pages

ECONOMICS, ENVIRONMENTAL POLICY AND THE TRANSCENDENCE OF UTILITARIANISM

ByGeoffrey Hodgson

part |2 pages

Part II ENVIRONMENTAL VALUE: LIMITS OF AN ECONOMIC MODEL

chapter 4|8 pages

RATIONALITY AND SOCIAL NORMS

ByMark Peacock

chapter 5|14 pages

VALUE PLURALISM, INCOMMENSURABILITY AND INSTITUTIONS

ByJohn O’Neill

chapter 6|14 pages

PRICING THE COUNTRYSIDE

The example of Tir Cymen
BySimon Bilsborough

chapter 7|16 pages

THE RELATIONS BETWEEN PRESERVATION VALUE AND EXISTENCE VALUE

ByJeremy Roxbee Cox

chapter 8|16 pages

SUBSTITUTABILITY

Or, why strong sustainability is weak and absurdly strong sustainability is not absurd
ByAlan Holland

chapter 9|18 pages

METHODOLOGY AND INSTITUTIONS

Value as seen from the risk field
ByBrian Wynne

part |2 pages

Part III VALUING NATURE: NEW DIRECTIONS

chapter 10|15 pages

EXISTENCE VALUE, MORAL COMMITMENTS AND IN-KIND VALUATION

ByJonathan Aldred

chapter 11|16 pages

ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT WITHOUT ENVIRONMENTAL VALUATION?

ByClive Spash

chapter 12|25 pages

MULTI-CRITERIA MAPPING

Mitigating the problems of environmental valuation?
ByAndrew Stirling

chapter 14|15 pages

ENVIRONMENT AND CREATIVE VALUE

ByJohn Foster