ABSTRACT

The British system of dealing with drug addiction is notable for its flexibility and its capacity to adapt to changing circumstances. Because of this it has attracted considerable international interest, although it is rarely fully understood or accurately represented.

Presenting a comprehensive account of the development of policies and treatments, Heroin Addiction brings together the perspectives of policy makers, practitioners and social commentators. The book contributes to a proper understanding of how policy and practice has evolved so that lessons for future policy and practice may be identified.
Volume II of Heroin Addiction charts the development and use of treatment and policy responses in the UK, highlighting the limitations of these approaches as well as their achievements. It is a unique source of reference for students, researchers, healthcare professionals and drug agencies both in the UK and overseas.

chapter 1|16 pages

The history of prescribing heroin and other injectable drugs as addiction treatment in the UK

ByJOHN STRANG, SUSAN RUBEN, MICHAEL FARRELL, JOHN WITTON, FRANCIS KEANEY, MICHAEL GOSSOP

chapter 4|12 pages

Uncertainty within the drug clinics in the 1970s

ByMARTIN MITCHESON

chapter 5|15 pages

The fall and rise of the general practitioner

ByALAN GLANZ

chapter 9|15 pages

The coming of age of oral methadone maintenance treatment in the UK in the 1990s

ByMICHAEL FARRELL, DUNCAN RAISTRICK

chapter 11|13 pages

Experimental amphetamine maintenance prescribing

ByPHILIP FLEMING

chapter 12|11 pages

Needle exchange in Britain

ByJANIE SHERIDAN

chapter 15|12 pages

The origins, arrival and spread of residential Minnesota Model centres across the UK

ByTIM LEIGHTON, NICK BARTON

chapter 16|11 pages

Treatment to order: the new drug treatment and testing orders

ByEMILY FINCH, MIKE ASHTON

chapter 17|8 pages

The Government Task Force and its review of drug treatment services: the promotion of an evidence-based approach

ByJOHN POLKINGHORNE, MICHAEL GOSSOP, JOHN STRANG