ABSTRACT

This book reappraises the British and American experience in curriculum studies, the curious way in which it has been dominated by certain ideas and introduces the reader to alternative ways of perceiving, defining and approaching its problems. It provides a radical critique of the whole area, presenting both Marxist and phenomenological perspectives on the current dilemmas that teachers face. The book argues that in order to understand the problems teachers face in coping with the curriculum, we must look at the situation from the point of view of the individual rather than prescribing a norm for all teachers. The dynamic relationship between the individual and the collective and the teacher and the state is one of the fundamental issues in solving the present problems in curriculum studies. The book focuses on this central problem and suggests a variety of ways in which new solutions may be found.

part |34 pages

Introduction

chapter |9 pages

Introduction

ByMartin Lawn, Len Barton

chapter |23 pages

Theory and Practice and the Reconceptualisation of Curriculum Studies

ByWilliam Pinar, Madeleine Grumet

part |67 pages

Critical Reappraisal

chapter |3 pages

Introduction

ByMartin Lawn, Len Barton

chapter |40 pages

Radical Education: The Pedagogical Subtext

ByMaureen Clark, David Davies

part |77 pages

New Directions

part |59 pages

Curriculum Practice

chapter |2 pages

Introduction

ByMartin Lawn, Len Barton

chapter |23 pages

Practice and Theory

ByMike Golby

chapter |12 pages

Curriculum Politics and Emancipation

ByMartin Lawn, Len Barton