ABSTRACT

A major transformation of Chinese higher education (HE) has taken place over the past decade – China has reshaped its higher education sector from elite to mass education with the number of graduates having quadrupled to three million a year over six years. China is exceptional among lower income countries in using tertiary education as a development strategy on such a scale, aiming to improve the quality of its graduates, and make HE available to as many of its citizens as possible.

This book provides a critical examination the challenges to the development and sustainability of higher education in China: Can its universities move from quantity to quality? How will so many graduates find jobs in line with their expectations? Can Britain and other western countries continue to benefit from China’s education boom? What are the prospects for collaboration in research? This book evaluates the prospects for Chinese and foreign HE providers, regulators and other stakeholders. It introduces the key changes in China’s HE programme since the Opening-Up policy in 1978 and analyses the achievements and the challenges over the subsequent three decades. Furthermore, it sheds light on new reforms that are likely to take place in the future, particularly as a result of the ongoing international financial crisis.

chapter |10 pages

Introduction

ByW. John Morgan, Bin Wu

part |68 pages

Widening the provision of higher education

chapter |17 pages

The regional division of the higher education sector in China

A spatial analysis
ByAijuan Chen, Bin Wu

chapter |18 pages

Adult higher education in China

Problems and potential
ByNaixia Wang

chapter |18 pages

The role of distance education in higher education in contemporary China

ByBernadette Robinson, Shuoqin Yan, Shukun Mo

chapter |13 pages

Private higher education in China

Problems and possibilities
ByFengliang Li, W. John Morgan

part |40 pages

Expansion and its consequences

chapter |12 pages

Thirty years of reforming China's higher education funding mechanism

ByXiaohao Ding, Fengliang Li, Yuze Sun

chapter |16 pages

The labour market for graduates in China

ByFengliang Li, W. John Morgan, Xiaohao Ding

chapter |10 pages

The occupational orientation of doctoral graduates in China

ByYandong Zhao, Dasheng Deng

part |52 pages

A growing global perspective

chapter |18 pages

Higher education and Chinese teachers

Professional education in the context of China's curriculum reform
ByJanette Ryan

chapter |15 pages

Education reform in Hong Kong

Implications for higher education and lifelong learning
ByJohn Cribbin

chapter |17 pages

Brain power stored overseas?

An Australian case study of the Chinese knowledge diaspora
ByRui Yang