ABSTRACT

Taking as its premise the belief that communalism is not a resurgence of tradition but is instead an inherently modern phenomenon, as well as a product of the fundamental agencies and ideas of modernity, and that globalization is neither a unique nor unprecedented process, this book addresses the question of whether globalization has amplified or muted processes of communalism. It does so through exploring the concurrent histories of communalism and globalization in four South Asian contexts - India, Pakistan, Bangladesh and Sri Lanka - as well as in various diasporic locations, from the nineteenth century to the present.

Including contributions by some of the most notable scholars working on communalism in South Asia and its diaspora as well as by some challenging new voices, the book encompasses both different disciplinary and theoretical perspectives. It looks at a range of methodologies in an effort to stimulate new debates on the relationship between communalism and globalization, and is a useful contribution to studies on South Asia and Asian History.

part |2 pages

Part I Introduction

part |2 pages

Part II Thinking historically

chapter 3|13 pages

Salafi extremism in the Punjab and its transnational impact

ByTAHIR KAMRAN

chapter 4|13 pages

Western Hindutva: Hindu nationalism in the United Kingdom and North America

Byand North America CHRISTOPHE JAFFRELOT AND INGRID THERWATH

chapter 5|16 pages

Empire, geo-politics and ethno-nationalisms: Ireland, India and Sri Lanka

ByIndia and Sri Lanka JUDE LAL FERNANDO

part |2 pages

Part III Contemporary connections: Problems and possibilities

part |2 pages

Part IV Theoretical constructions

chapter 12|23 pages

Islam, gender and the nation: The social life of Bangladeshi fatwas

ByDINA MAHNAZ SIDDIQI

chapter 13|10 pages

Kottu.org: Community after communalism

ByPRADEEP JEGANATHAN

chapter 14|14 pages

New directions: Communalism, globalization and governmentality

ByDEANA HEATH