ABSTRACT

The preparation of social studies teachers is crucial not only to the project of good education, but, even more broadly, to the cultivation of a healthy democracy and the growth of a nation’s citizens. This one-of-a-kind resource features ideas from over 100 of the field's most thoughtful teacher educators reflecting on their best practices and offering specific strategies through which future teachers can learn to teach, thus illuminating the careful planning and deep thinking that go into the preparation of the social studies teachers. While concentrating on daily teaching realities such as lesson planning and meeting national, state, or provincial standards, each contributor also wrestles with the most important current issues on educating teachers for today’s increasingly diverse, complex, and global society.

Features of this unique teaching resource include:

    • Volume sections that are arranged by both disciplinary organization and approach or activity.
    • Thoughtful introductory section essays that conceptualize each theme, providing a conscientious theoretical overview and analysis of each individual section.
    • Rich and concrete examples of best practice from some of the field's most diverse and highly regarded scholars and teacher educators
    • An index that identifies the appropriate teaching level and teacher education context and links the strategies and ideas that are presented in the essay to the relevant INTASC and NCSS standards for quick reference in classroom planning as well as institutional development and implementation.

A much-needed addition to the field, this comprehensive volume will be of value to any teacher interested in social studies or diversity education across age groups and educational contexts.

chapter |10 pages

Introduction: How to Use Th is Book

ByELIZABETH E. HEILMAN

part |4 pages

Section 1: Purposes, Beliefs, and Contexts for Social Education

chapter 1|4 pages

Developing a Pedagogic Creed through Critical Social Refl ection

ByWILLIAM GAUDELLI

chapter 2|4 pages

Th e Metaphors We Teach By

ByMARGARET SMITH CROCCO

chapter 3|3 pages

Exploring Th ree Orientations to the Social Studies

ByTHOMAS FALLACE

chapter 4|4 pages

Pedagogic Creed as Foundation

ByRONALD W. EVANS

chapter 5|3 pages

Th e Social Studies Topical Index

ByPAUL ROBINSON

part |3 pages

Section 2: Democratic Values and Government

chapter 9|3 pages

Th ose Pesky Little Words: How to Teach Abstract Civic Concepts

ByBARBARA SLATER STERN

chapter 10|4 pages

Understanding and Teaching Core Democratic Concepts

ByELIZABETH E. HEILMAN

chapter 11|6 pages

Studying Authority in a Secondary Teacher Education Class

ByJUDITH L. PACE

chapter 12|3 pages

Using Children’s Books to Explore Power, Tyranny, and Justice

ByRICH GIBSON AND E. WAYNE ROSS

chapter 14|3 pages

Feelings Exploration in Social Justice Education

ByJEFF PASSE

chapter 15|3 pages

Teaching Procedural Democracy in the Classroom

ByDAVID H. VAWTER

chapter 16|4 pages

Preparing Teachers and Educating Citizens: Th e Simulated Congressional Hearing

ByTERRENCE C. MASON, JENNIFER M. PONDER

part |3 pages

Section 3: Evidence, Sources, and Interpretation in History INTRODUCTION BY BRENDA TROFANENKO AND MATTHEW T. MISSIAS

part |3 pages

Section 4: History in Social Contexts INTRODUCTION BY MATTHEW T. MISSIAS AND MORGAN OTT

chapter 25|3 pages

Th e Nature of Evidence and Interpretation in History

BySCOTT W. DEWITT

chapter 27|3 pages

Oral Histories in Social Education

ByEDRIC C. JOHNSON

chapter 28|4 pages

Designing an Interactive Learning Center Museum in the School Context

ByHILARY LANDORF, ETHAN LOWENSTEIN

chapter 29|4 pages

Scaff olding Conceptual Reasoning about History

ByDAVID GERWIN

chapter 30|4 pages

Teaching Historical Understanding with Christopher Columbus

ByBENJAMIN JUSTICE

chapter 31|4 pages

Addressing Subjectivity in Historical Th inking: Who was Christopher Columbus?

ByJENNIFER HAUVER JAMES

part |4 pages

Section 5: Perspective Consciousness about Identity, Power, and Culture

chapter 32|3 pages

Exploring Identity, Commonality, and Diff erence

ByTRACY ROCK

chapter 33|3 pages

Who Are We? Exploring Our Class as a Cultural Demographic

ByJOHN D. HOGE

chapter 35|5 pages

Seeing the Hidden Curricula of Social Spaces and Places

ByELIZABETH E. HEILMAN

chapter 37|3 pages

Th e Family History Project: Uncovering the Personal as Political

ByNANCYE E. MCCRARY

chapter 41|3 pages

A Meeting On the Congo: Race, Voice, and Representation

ByMERRY M. MERRYFIELD

chapter 42|4 pages

Implicating Race in Students’ Learning How to Teach History

ByAVNER SEGALL

part |3 pages

Section 6: Local and Global Communities and Economies

chapter 46|5 pages

Examining Privilege in Globalization

BySANDRA SCHMIDT

chapter 47|4 pages

Teaching Global Education in Seemingly Regional and National Curriculum

ByELIZABETH E. HEILMAN

chapter 49|4 pages

Teaching Current Events from a Global Perspective

ByTONI FUSS KIRKWOODTUCKER

chapter 50|4 pages

Environment Toxins Near and Far: Health and Civic Responsibility

ByDAVID HURSH, CAMILLE MARTINA, MICHAEL FANTAUZZO

part |3 pages

Section 7: Current Events and Controversial Issues INTRODUCTION BY ELIZABETH E. HEILMAN AND KATIE GJERPEN

chapter 53|4 pages

Good Discussions Don’t Just Happen: Verbal Questioning Skills

ByKENNETH E. VOGLER

chapter 54|4 pages

Getting Students to Actively Follow the News

ByDEBORAH BYRNES

chapter 55|3 pages

Teaching about Disasters Reported in the News

ByBRIAN LANAHAN

chapter 56|3 pages

Issues-Centered Social Studies Unit Sampler

ByKIM E. KOEPPEN

chapter 57|3 pages

Th e “Daily Dilemma”: Sharing Power with a Purpose

ByBETH C. RUBIN

chapter 58|3 pages

Encouraging Transformative Understanding of Controversial Issues

ByBRUNA IRENE GRIMBERG

chapter 59|4 pages

Social Studies Methods, Purpose, and the “Execution Class”

ByTODD DINKELMAN

part |4 pages

Section 8: Using a Range of Resources

chapter 62|3 pages

Incorporating Visual Learning in the Classroom

ByBROOKE S. ORR, SIGNIA WARNER

chapter 64|6 pages

Teaching with and about Maps

ByAVNER SEGALL

chapter 66|4 pages

Socratic Seminar: A Model for Film Discussion in the Social Studies

ByJEREMY D. STODDARD

chapter 67|4 pages

Not Playing Around: Teaching Role-Plays in Social Education

ByWAYNE AU

chapter 68|5 pages

Using Multicultural Literature in Teaching for Social Justice

BySUNG CHOON PARK AND CYNTHIA A. TYSON

chapter 69|3 pages

Voices of Our Community: Making Connections through Digital Stories

ByELIZABETH K. WILSON, VIVIAN WRIGHT

part |3 pages

Section 9: Instruction and Curriculum Design

chapter 73|4 pages

Th e Modeling Approach to Social Studies Teacher Education

ByMICHAEL P. MARINO, BENJAMIN M. JACOBS

chapter 74|5 pages

Instructional Planning and Practice through Microteaching

ByANNELISE HALVORSEN

chapter 75|4 pages

Approaching Curriculum Units as Terrains and Systems to Explore

ByPAUL SKILTONSYLVESTER

chapter 77|7 pages

Teaching Students to Use the Inquiry Method

ByJAMES M. HARTWICK

chapter 80|4 pages

Creating Units to Create Meaning Out of Social Studies Content

ByAUDREY GREEN ROGERS

chapter 81|5 pages

Using Narrative to Refl ect on the Process of Curriculum Enactment

ByM. GAIL HICKEY