ABSTRACT

Consumptive forms of wildlife tourism (hunting, shooting and fishing) have become a topic of interest – both to the tourism industry, in terms of destinations seeking to establish or grow this sector, and to other stakeholders such as environmental organisations, animal-rights groups, and the general public. Hunting tourism, in particular, has come under fire with accusations that it is contributing to the demise of some species. Practices such as "canned hunting" (within fenced safari parks) or the use of hounds are described as unethical, and fishing tourism too has attracted recent negative publicity as it is said to be cruel. At the same time, however, many peripheral and indigenous communities around the world are strategising how to capitalise on consumptive forms of wildlife tourism.

This book addresses a range of contentious issues facing the consumptive wildlife tourism sector across a number of destinations in Europe, North America, Africa, India, Arabia and Oceania. Practices such as baited bear hunting, trophy hunting of threatened species, and hunting for conservation are debated, along with the impact of this type of tourism on indigenous communities and on wider societies. Research on all aspects of "consumptive wildlife tourism" is included, which for the purposes of the book is defined to include all tourism that involves the intended killing of wildlife for sport purposes, and may include the harvest of wildlife products. This includes, among others, recreational hunting, big-game hunting and safari operations, traditional/indigenous hunting, game-bird shooting, hunting with hounds, freshwater angling and saltwater game fishing etc.

This is the first book to specifically address tourist aspects of consumption of wildlife. It will appeal to tourism and recreation academics and students, tourism industry operators, community tourism planners and wildlife managers.

part |2 pages

PART I Introduction and conceptual issues

chapter 1|28 pages

An introduction to consumptive wildlife tourism

ByBRENT LOVELOCK

chapter 2|14 pages

The ‘Animal Question’ and the ‘consumption’ of wildlife

ByADRIAN FRANKLIN

chapter 3|12 pages

The lure of fl y-fi shing

ByROBERT PRESTON-WHYTE

part |2 pages

PART II Historic precedents

chapter 4|14 pages

The Scandinavian Sporting Tour 1830–1914

ByPIA SILLANPÄÄ

chapter 7|14 pages

Shooting tigers as leisure in colonial India

ByKEVIN HANNAM

part |2 pages

PART III Impacts of consumptive wildlife tourism

chapter 8|14 pages

Conservation hunting concepts, Canada’s Inuit, and polar bear hunting

ByLEE FOOTE, GEORGE WENZEL

chapter 9|12 pages

Environmental values of consumptive and non-consumptive marine tourists

ByJACKIE DAWSON, BRENT LOVELOCK

chapter 10|14 pages

The success and sustainability of consumptive wildlife tourism in Africa

ByJOSEPH E. MBAIWA

chapter 11|14 pages

Trophy hunting and recreational angling in Namibia: An economic, social and environmental comparison

ByJONATHAN I . BARNES AND MARINA NOVELLI

chapter 12|13 pages

Welfare foundations for effi cient management of wildlife and fi sh resources for recreational use in Sweden

ByLEIF MATTSSON, MATTIAS BOMAN, GÖRAN ERICSSON, ANTON PAULRUD

chapter 14|15 pages

Arab falconry: Changes, challenges and conservation opportunities of an ancient art

ByPHILIP J . SEDDON AND FREDERIC LAUNAY

part |2 pages

PART IV Current issues and destination development

chapter 19|13 pages

Australia as a safari hunting destination for exotic animals

BySTEPHEN J. CRAIG-SMITH AND GORDON McL. DRYDEN