ABSTRACT

Although an important part of the origins of analytic philosophy can be traced back to philosophy in Austria in the first part of the twentieth century, remarkably little is known about the specific contribution made by Austrian philosophy and philosophers.

In The Austrian Contribution to Analytic Philosophy, prominent analytic philosophers take a fresh look at the roots of analytic philosophy in the thought of influential but often overlooked Austrian philosophers including Brentano, Meinong, Bolzano, Husserl, and Witasek. The contributors to this volume investigate central topics in theoretical philosophy such as intentionality, consciousness, memory, attributes, and truth as well as political philosophy and aesthetics.

This original collection will be of interest to anyone studying the origins of analytic philosophy as well as contemporary debates in philosophy of language, metaphysics and mind.

chapter |19 pages

Introduction

ByMARK TEXTOR

chapter 1|16 pages

Brentano’s concept of intentional inexistence

ByTIM CRANE

chapter 2|28 pages

Reid and Brentano on consciousness

ByKEITH HOSSACK

chapter 3|25 pages

Meinong on memory

ByFABRICE TERONI

chapter 4|41 pages

Certainty, soil and sediment

ByKEVIN MULLIGAN

chapter 5|29 pages

Particularised attributes: An Austrian tale

ByBENJAMIN SCHNIEDER

chapter 6|25 pages

Austrian philosophers on truth

ByPETER SIMONS

chapter 7|66 pages

Analyticity and logical truth: From Bolzano to Quine

ByWOLFGANG KÜNNE

chapter 8|14 pages

The great divide within Austrian philosophy: The synthetic a priori

ByEDGAR MORSCHER

chapter 9|29 pages

Bolzano’s political philosophy

ByROLF GEORGE, PAUL RUSNOCK

chapter 10|31 pages

Austrian aesthetics

ByMARIA E. REICHER