ABSTRACT

Most writers associated with the first generation of British Romanticism - Blake, Coleridge, Wordsworth, Southey, Thelwall, and others - wrote against the slave trade. This edition collects a corpus of work which reflects the issues and theories concerning slavery and the status of the slave.

chapter

Introduction

ByPeter J. Kitson

part I|247 pages

Anti-Slave Trade

part |33 pages

An Essay on the Treatment and Conversion of African Slaves in the British Sugar Colonies (London, 1784)

chapter |2 pages

Overview

ByJames Ramsay

chapter |31 pages

Ramsay, Essay on Treatment and Conversion

ByJames Ramsay

part |37 pages

An Essay on the Slavery and Commerce of the Human Species (London, 1788)

chapter |2 pages

Overview

ByThomas Clarkson

chapter |35 pages

Part III. The Slavery of the Africans, in the European Colonies.

ByThomas Clarkson

part |43 pages

Thoughts on the African Slave Trade (London, 1788)

chapter |1 pages

Overview

ByJohn Newton

chapter |41 pages

Thoughts upon the African Slave Trade.

ByJohn Newton

part |16 pages

An Account of the Slave Trade on the Coast of Africa (London, 1788)

chapter |1 pages

Overview

ByAlexander Falconbridge

chapter |14 pages

Treatment of the Slaves.

ByAlexander Falconbridge

part |17 pages

Speech on the motion for the abolition of the slave trade, 12 May 1789 [containing] Twelve Propositions submitted ... by Mr Wilberforce, to the consideration of the committee, to whom the report of the Privy Council ... (London, 1789)

chapter |2 pages

Overview

ByWilliam Wilberforce

chapter |15 pages

Debate on the Abolition of the Slave Trade.

ByWilliam Wilberforce

part |13 pages

An Address to the People of Great Britain, on the Propriety of Abstaining from West India Sugar and Rum (London, 1791)

chapter |2 pages

Overview

ByWilliam Fox

part |42 pages

Sketch of the Negro Code (1792)

chapter |1 pages

Overview

ByEdmund Burke

chapter |7 pages

A Letter to the Right. Hon. Henry Dundas,

ByEdmund Burke

chapter |33 pages

Sketch of the Negro Code.

ByEdmund Burke

part |12 pages

‘On the Slave Trade’ (Bristol, 1796)

chapter |2 pages

Overview

BySamuel Taylor Coleridge

chapter |10 pages

On the Slave Trade.

BySamuel Taylor Coleridge

part |27 pages

‘Review of The History of the Abolition of the Slave Trade.

chapter |1 pages

Overview

BySamuel Taylor Coleridge

part II|129 pages

Pro-Slave Trade

part |30 pages

Remarks Upon the Situation of Negroes in Jamaica, impartially made From local Experience of nearly Thirteen Years in that Island (London, 1788)

part |43 pages

Scriptural Researches on the Licitness of the Slave-Trade, shewing its conformity with the principles of natural and revealed religion, delineated in the Sacred Writings of the Word of God (Liverpool, 1788)

chapter |2 pages

Overview

ByRaimundo Hormoza

chapter |41 pages

Harris, Scriptural Researches on the Slave trade

ByRaimundo Hormoza

part |23 pages

A Speech delivered at a Free Conference between the Honourable Council and Assembly of Jamaica … On the Subject of Mr. Wilberforce’s Propositions in the House of Commons, concerning the Slave Trade (Kingston Jamaica, 1789; London, 1790)

part |21 pages

Observations on the Project for Abolishing the Slave Trade and on the reasonableness of attempting some practicable mode of relieving the Negroes (London, 1790)

part |7 pages

‘Slave Trade’, Political Register (January-June, 1802)

chapter |2 pages

Overview

ByWilliam Cobbett

chapter |5 pages

Slavh trade.

ByWilliam Cobbett