ABSTRACT

U.S. congressional debates over the last few years have highlighted a paradox: although research demonstrates that emergencies are most effectively managed at the local level, fiscal support and programmatic management in response to disasters has shifted to the federal level. While the growing complexity of catastrophes may overwhelm local capacities and would seem to necessitate more federal engagement, can a federal approach be sustainable, and can it contribute to local capacity-building?

This timely book examines local capacity-building as well as the current legal, policy and fiscal framework for disaster management, questioning some of the fundamentals of the current system, exploring whether accountability and responsibilities are correctly placed, offering alternative models, and taking stock of the current practices that reflect an effective use of resources in a complex emergency management system. The Future of Disaster Management in the U.S. will be of interest to disaster and emergency managers as well as public servants and policy-makers at all levels tasked with responding to increasingly complex catastrophes of all kinds.

chapter 1|12 pages

The Centralization of Emergency Management

ByAMY LEPORE

part |2 pages

SECTION I Legislation

part |2 pages

SECTION II Policy

chapter 5|15 pages

Local Recovery: How Robust Community Rebound Necessarily Comes from the Bottom Up

ByEMILY CHAMLEE-WRIGHT, STEFANIE HAEFFELE-BALCH, AND

chapter 6|25 pages

Small Businesses as a Vulnerable Population

ByMARK R. LANDAHL, TONYA T. NEAVES

chapter 7|40 pages

Managing Human Capital in Times of Crisis: The Role of Employees in Disaster Management

BySTACEY C. MANN, JONATHAN W. GADDY

part |2 pages

SECTION III Finance

chapter 9|14 pages

Financial Resiliency by Local Governments to Natural Disasters

ByROBERT BLAND, JESSECA E. SHORT, SIMON A. ANDREW

chapter 10|21 pages

The Effects of Natural Disasters on Local-Government Finance

ByFinance ORKHAN ISMAYILOV AND SIMON A. ANDREW