ABSTRACT

Over 39 chapters The Routledge Companion to British Cinema History offers a comprehensive and revisionist overview of British cinema as, on the one hand, a commercial entertainment industry and, on the other, a series of institutions centred on economics, funding and relations to government.

Whereas most histories of British cinema focus on directors, stars, genres and themes, this Companion explores the forces enabling and constraining the films’ production, distribution, exhibition, and reception contexts from the late nineteenth century to the present day.

The contributors provide a wealth of empirical and archive-based scholarship that draws on insider perspectives of key film institutions and illuminates aspects of British film culture that have been neglected or marginalized, such as the watch committee system, the Eady Levy, the rise of the multiplex and film festivals.

It also places emphasis on areas where scholarship has either been especially productive and influential, such as in early and silent cinema, or promoted new approaches, such as audience and memory studies.

 

chapter |20 pages

Introduction: British cinema history

ByI.Q. HUNTER, LARAINE PORTER AND JUSTIN SMITH

part |2 pages

PART I British silent cinema to the coming of sound: 1895–1930

chapter 1|11 pages

The origins of British cinema, 1895–1918

ByBRYONY DIXON

chapter 2|13 pages

“Temporary American citizens”: British cinema in the 1920s

ByLARAINE PORTER

chapter 4|10 pages

Designing the silent British film

ByLAURIE N. EDE

chapter 5|9 pages

Stardom in silent cinema

ByADRIAN GARVEY

chapter 8|10 pages

The Tudor Cinema, Leicester: a local case study

ByGUY BAREFOOT

chapter 9|10 pages

The rise of the Film Society movement

ByRICHARD MACDONALD

part |2 pages

PART II The classic period: 1930–80

chapter 11|9 pages

Local film censorship: the watch committee system

ByALEX ROCK

chapter 12|12 pages

Producers and moguls in the British film industry, 1930–80

ByANDREW SPICER

chapter 13|10 pages

Émigrés in classic British cinema

ByANDREW MOOR

chapter 18|9 pages

The Children’s Film Foundation

ByANDREW ROBERTS

chapter 20|11 pages

Cinema and the age of television, 1950–70

BySIAN BARBER

chapter 21|11 pages

The BBFC and the apparatus of censorship

ByLUCY BRETT

chapter 22|9 pages

The British Film Institute: between culture and industry

ByRICHARD PATERSON

chapter 23|11 pages

Trades unions and the British film industry, 1930s–80s

ByIAIN REID

chapter 25|12 pages

Good of its kind? British film journalism

BySHELDON HALL

part |2 pages

PART III Contemporary British cinema: 1980 to the present

chapter 26|10 pages

Cult films in British cinema and film culture

ByKATE EGAN

chapter 27|11 pages

The Scala Cinema: a case study

ByJANE GILES

chapter 28|11 pages

Underground film-making: British Super 8 in the 1980s

ByJO COMINO

chapter 29|11 pages

The rise of the multiplex

BySTUART HANSON

chapter 30|10 pages

Rewind, playback: re-viewing the “video boom” in Britain

ByJOHNNY WALKER

chapter 33|9 pages

The architects of BBC Films

ByANNE WOODS

chapter 34|10 pages

The UKFC and the Regional Screen Agencies

ByJACK NEWSINGER

chapter 35|10 pages

Hollywood blockbusters and UK production today

ByJAMES RUSSELL

chapter 36|10 pages

Distributing British cinema

ByJULIA KNIGHT

chapter 37|9 pages

Memories of British cinema

ByMATTHEW JONES