ABSTRACT

How did we let teacher burn-out happen, and what can we do about it – before it's too late?

This brave and disruptive book accurately defines the problems of low teacher morale and offers systemic, future-proof and realistic solutions to bringing hope, energy and joy back to the profession. The simple answer is staring us in the face: increase teacher agency. Our rallying cry: our profession needs a return to values of humanity, pride, and professionalism.

From research literacy to a collective voice, better CPD to smarter accountability, contributors to this book demonstrate the huge scope for increased teacher influence at every level of the education sector. Education voices including Sam Twiselton, Alison Peacock, David Weston and Andy Hargreaves, supported by a broad range of academics and policy makers, vouch for increased teacher agency and stronger, more powerful networks as a means of improving practice, combatting teacher disillusionment, and radically improving UK education. This text offers an exciting and hopeful perspective on education; urging teachers to work together to ‘flip the system’ and challenging policy makers to help… or get out of the way.

 

Chapters have been contributed by Tom Bennett, Peter Ford, Jonathan Firth, David Weston, David Williams, Zeba Clarke, Julie Smith, Dr Robert Loe, Jeremy Pattle, Debra Kidd, Steven Watson, Ross Morrison McGill, George Gilchrist, Howard Stevenson, Professor Dame Alison Peacock, d’Reen Struthers, Phil Wood, Rae Snape, Simon Gibbs, Ross Hall, Jackie Ward, Simon Knight, David Frost, Sheila Ball, Sarah Lightfoot, Andy Hargreaves, Darren Macey, Gary Farrell, Julian Critchley, Tony Gallagher, Gareth Alcott, Sam Twiselton, Jelmer Evers, Alma Harris, Michelle Jones, Natalie Scott, Deborah M. Netolicky, Jon Andrews, Cameron Paterson, Per Kornhall, Joe Hallgarten, Tom Beresford and Sara Hjelm.

chapter |2 pages

From supply agency to demand agency

Taking back control
ByJL Dutaut, Lucy Rycroft-Smith

part |43 pages

The teachers’ manifesto

chapter |8 pages

There are no ninjas

Why the research revolution might rescue teaching
ByTom Bennett

chapter |5 pages

Beyond the policy VAKuum

An educational journey
ByPeter Ford

chapter |9 pages

Experts in learning

ByJonathan Firth

chapter |4 pages

From data rich to data smart

Empowering teaching, not monitoring teachers
ByDavid Weston

chapter |4 pages

Breaking free of the machine

Lessons from Wales
ByDavid Williams

chapter |5 pages

Shedding our inhibitions

From external to internal accountability
ByZeba Clarke

chapter |4 pages

Practitioner-led research

Towards professional autonomy
ByJulie Smith

part |55 pages

The teachers’ manifesto

chapter |10 pages

Measuring what matters

The relational foundations of school systems
ByRobert Loe

chapter |3 pages

Walking with dinosaurs

ByJeremy Pattle

chapter |4 pages

Complex needn’t be complicated

ByDebra Kidd

chapter |8 pages

A manifesto for control

Democracy, scholarship, activism and solidarity
BySteven Watson

chapter |7 pages

CPDEducation’s Achilles heel

ByRoss Morrison McGill

chapter |5 pages

Accountability and agency in a Scottish school

ByGeorge Gilchrist

chapter |6 pages

Flip the system? Get organised!

ByHoward Stevenson

chapter |8 pages

The Chartered College of Teaching

Professional learning without limits
ByAlison Peacock

part |54 pages

The teachers’ manifesto

chapter |8 pages

Professional resilience and wellbeing

Byd’Reen Struthers

chapter |8 pages

Lesson study

An approach to claiming slow time for professional growth
ByPhil Wood

chapter |4 pages

Only connect

Resisting the winds of change
ByRae Snape

chapter |12 pages

Inclusion and teachers’ beliefs in their efficacy

BySimon Gibbs

chapter |3 pages

Making a difference

The view from a PRU
ByJackie Ward

chapter |5 pages

The progressive traditionalism of special education

BySimon Knight

chapter |5 pages

The HertsCam network

Supporting non-positional teacher leadership
ByDavid Frost, Sheila Ball, Sarah Lightfoot

part |52 pages

The teachers’ manifesto

chapter |8 pages

Time for a flipping change

ByAndy Hargreaves

chapter |4 pages

The only way is long-term

ByDarren Macey

chapter |4 pages

A Northern Irish perspective

ByGary Farrell

chapter |8 pages

How education policy-makers make mistakes

ByJulian Critchley

chapter |6 pages

Contrasting experiences of marginalisation and empowerment

ByTony Gallagher

chapter |10 pages

A system with synergy

Bringing together all that is good in our system
ByGareth Alcott

chapter |8 pages

Towards a teacher-focused system

Lessons from the Carter Review of ITE
BySam Twiselton

part |41 pages

The teachers’ manifesto

chapter |4 pages

Systems matter

The future of the teaching profession
ByJelmer Evers

chapter |9 pages

The unintended outcomes of PISA

ByAlma Harris, Michelle Jones

chapter |4 pages

Teachers sans frontières

ByNatalie Scott

chapter |5 pages

Flipping the system

A perspective from down under
ByDeborah M. Netolicky, Jon Andrews, Cameron Paterson

chapter |6 pages

Flipping Sweden

ByPer Kornhall

chapter |7 pages

Creating conditions for system-wide innovation

Humanising innovation in schools
ByJoe Hallgarten, Tom Beresford

chapter |4 pages

Someone to discuss with …

BySara Hjelm