ABSTRACT

The dynamics of transatlantic relations in the twenty-first century have been shaped by an American preference for the exercise of its considerable 'hard power' capabilities while Europeans have preferred to draw upon the considerable 'soft power' resources that have grown from their enviable internal processes of integration. These diverging power preferences have differential impacts on the management of Atlantic security, economic, and social and cultural relations. The contributors, long-time observers and analysts of the Atlantic partnership, debate how problematic security relations are likely to continue to be, discuss how successfully economic affairs will be managed, and examine the continuing frictions in domestic politics of social and cultural matters that should be manageable if both European and American leaders work actively and responsibly to encourage policy convergence.

part |2 pages

PART I THE LEGACY OF THE TRANSATLANTIC ALLIANCE

chapter 1|6 pages

Introduction: Decline or Renewal?

ByThomas L. Ilgen

chapter 2|16 pages

The Atlantic Alliance and the Integration of Europe

ByThomas L. Ilgen

chapter 3|12 pages

Soft Power and European-American Affairs

ByJoseph S. Nye, Jr.

part |2 pages

PART II SECURITY AFFAIRS

chapter 4|20 pages

A Post-Modern Transatlantic Alliance

ByGregory F. Treverton

chapter 5|12 pages

The ESDP: A Threat to the Transatlantic Alliance?

ByChristopher Coker

part |2 pages

PART III ECONOMIC RELATIONS

chapter 6|18 pages

The Euro and Transatlantic Relations

ByBenjamin J. Cohen

chapter 7|22 pages

Trade Relations Between the US and the EU

ByS. Linn Williams

part |2 pages

PART IV: DOMESTIC POLITICS AND TRANSATLANTIC VALUES

chapter 8|24 pages

Transatlantic Tensions in Food and Agriculture: Coming Together?

ByAdam Sheingate

chapter 9|24 pages

European Environmental Leadership: The EU Approach to GM Foods

ByPaulette Kurzer

chapter 10|30 pages

Anti-Europeanism and Euroskepticism in the United States

ByPatrick Chamorel

chapter 11|10 pages

Conclusion: The Future of the Transatlantic Partnership

ByThomas L. Ilgen