ABSTRACT

Resemblance and Reality in Greek Thought follows the construction of reality from Homer into the Hellenistic era and beyond. Not only in didactic poetry or philosophical works but in practically all genres from the time of Homer onwards, Greek literature has shown an awareness of the relationship between verbal art and the social, historical, or cultural reality that produces it, an awareness that this relationship is an approximate one at best and a distorting one at worst. This central theme of resemblance and its relationship to reality draws together essays on a range of Greek authors, and shows how they are unified or allied in posing similar questions to classical literature.

chapter |8 pages

Introduction: Resemblance and reality as interpretive lens

ByARUM PARK, MARY PENDERGRAFT

part |2 pages

PART I Greek poetry: Verbal resemblance as incomplete reality

part |2 pages

PART II Greek tragedy: Reality, expectation, tradition

chapter 6|19 pages

Necessity and universal reality: The use of χρή in Aeschylus

ByDAVID C.A. WILTSHIRE

chapter 8|11 pages

The “Bad Place”: The horrific house of Euripides’ Heracles

ByDEREK SMITH KEYSER

part |2 pages

PART III Greek prose: Reality and appearances

chapter 11|23 pages

The rational religion of Xenophon’s Socrates

ByDAVID JOHNSON

chapter 13|26 pages

Performing Plato’s Forms

ByPATRICK LEE MILLER

part |2 pages

Epilogue: Echoes of resemblance and reality in Latin literature