ABSTRACT

How do policy makers and managers square the circle of increasing demand and expectations for the delivery and quality of services against a backdrop of reduced public funding from government and philanthropists? Leaders, executives and managers are increasingly focusing on service operations improvement. In terms of research, public services are immature within the discipline of operations management, and existing knowledge is limited to government departments and large bureaucratic institutions.

Drawing on a range of theory and frameworks, this book develops the research agenda, and knowledge and understanding in public service operations management, addressing the most pressing dilemmas faced by leaders, executives and operations managers in the public services environment. It offers a new empirical analysis of the impact of contextual factors, including the migration of planning systems founded on MRP/ERP and the adoption of industrial based improvement practices such as TQM, lean thinking and Six Sigma.

This will be of interest to researchers, educators and advanced students in public management, service operations management, health service management and public policy studies.

chapter 1|10 pages

Introduction: the role and substance of public service operations management

ByZOE J. RADNOR, NICOLA BATEMAN

part |2 pages

PART I Strategy and service design

chapter 2|17 pages

Going the distance: sport operations management in the public and third sectors

ByDAVID BAMFORD, CLAIRE MOXHAM, KATRI KAUPPI, BENJAMIN DEHE

chapter 3|22 pages

Nonprofit–business collaboration: operationalising a strategy for nonprofit organisations

ByOMAR AL-TABBAA, DESMOND LEACH AND JOHN MARCH

chapter 5|21 pages

Humanitarian aid logistics: a new area for the public service research agenda?

BySTEPHEN PETTIT, ANTHONY BERESFORD, DAVID KNIGHT, MINCHUL SOHN

chapter 6|21 pages

Service systems design and implementation

ByTAMMI J. SINHA, SALLY PASTELLAS

part |2 pages

PART II Responsiveness and resourcing

chapter 8|17 pages

Drivers of change in the UK fire service: an operations management perspective

ByNICOLA BATEMAN, KAREN MAHER, RAY RANDALL

chapter 9|18 pages

Managing capacity and demand in a responsive repairs service: lessons from social housing

ByJOANNE MEEHAN, PAUL R. DRAKE, KIERAVOGEL, ADAM PARKHOUSE

part |2 pages

PART IV Improvement

chapter 15|21 pages

Deconstructing lean policing in England andWales: a knowledge creation perspective

ByHARRY BARTON, RUPERT L. MATTHEWS

chapter 16|16 pages

Operationalising lean in services: rediscovering service blueprinting

ByZOE J. RADNOR, STEPHEN P. OSBORNE

chapter 18|19 pages

A lean healthcare journey: the Scottish experience

ByCLAIRE F. LINDSAY, MANEESH KUMAR

chapter 19|18 pages

The English patient experience: does healthcare service quality matter?

ByMEL HUDSON SMITH

part |2 pages

PART V Supply chain management

chapter 20|23 pages

Mapping institutional pressures for e-SCM adoption: the case of health care supply chains

ByVIKRAM BHAKOO, AMRIK S. SOHAL

chapter 22|18 pages

Applying supply chain logic to criminal law enforcement: the case of The Netherlands

ByCAROLIEN DE BLOK, DIRK PIETERVAN DONK, ALINE SEEPMA AND INGE ROUKEMA

chapter 23|12 pages

Final reflections: the future research agenda on public service operations management

ByANN ESAIN, MANEESH KUMAR, SHARON J. WILLIAMS