ABSTRACT

Entrepreneurship is a growing field of research, attracting researchers from many different disciplines including economics, sociology, psychology, and management. The concept of entrepreneurship, and research in the field, is becoming institutionalized, increasingly oriented by influential trends, theories and methods, following the mainstream and being shaped accordingly.

The objective of this book is to move beyond mainstream approaches and assumptions which are dominating the field, and to raise questions about the nature and process of entrepreneurship research. Over twelve chapters, leading international thinkers in the field debate the impact and the consequences of institutionalization. Taking key research orientations including multidisciplinarity, international entrepreneurship, social entrepreneurship, and ethics, it takes a critical and constructive and sometimes controversial posture and encourages a re-examination of the way we look at the social and economic phenomenon of entrepreneurship.

This book is vital reading for entrepreneurship researchers and educators, advanced students and policy-makers in Entrepreneurship, Economics, Sociology and Psychology.

chapter |11 pages

Introduction

ByAlain Fayolle, Philippe Riot

chapter |16 pages

Dimly through the fog

Institutional forces affecting the multidisciplinary nature of entrepreneurship
ByHoward E. Aldrich

chapter |16 pages

Moving on

Affirming the entrepreneurial in entrepreneurship research
ByDaniel Hjorth

chapter |13 pages

The economic reification of entrepreneurship

Re-engaging with the social
ByAlistair R. Anderson

chapter |21 pages

Social entrepreneurship

To defend society from itself
ByKarin Berglund, Annika Skoglund

chapter |22 pages

Is international entrepreneurship research a viable spin-off from its parent disciplines?

ByNicole E. Coviello, Marian V. Jones, Patricia P. McDougall-Covin

chapter |23 pages

Navigating the growing field of entrepreneurship inquiry

Successionist and relational modes of theory development
ByDenise Fletcher, Paul Selden

chapter |10 pages

Legitimacy or relevance – that is the question

ByBengt Johannisson

chapter |24 pages

What makes scholarly works “interesting” in entrepreneurship research?

Learning from the past
ByHans Landström

chapter |8 pages

Entrepreneurship research without passion

Let's fall in love again
ByMatthias Fink, Isabella Hatak, Richard Lang, Daniela Maresch

chapter |7 pages

Conclusion

Final thoughts and perspectives
ByPhilippe Riot, Alain Fayolle