ABSTRACT

This book provides a comparative and accessible analysis of key areas of healthcare law, comparing English law with selected common and civil law jurisdictions within a framework of law and medical ethics, and encompassing pivotal cases, codes and legislation. The introduction examines medical decision making, and legal and ethical frameworks in Western and non-Western cultures.

Part I examines healthcare law in England and Wales, including abortion, consent, confidentiality, children, euthanasia, persistent vegetative state patients, organ transplantation, sterilisation of the mentally incapacitated, surrogacy, UK cloning proposals and the landmark conjoined twins case. Part II covers non-English common law jurisdictions such as Australia, New Zealand, Ireland and certain American jurisdictions. Civil law examples focus on France and Germany, and, where appropriate, Scandinavian countries. International perspectives on abortion laws and euthanasia are also provided.

The book concludes with a comparative overview, which highlights common healthcare themes across various jurisdictions. Comparative Healthcare Law brings together information never previously accessible within the covers of one volume, making this unique book indispensable for scholars and practitioners in the field of healthcare law.

part |2 pages

PART I HEALTHCARE LAW IN ENGLAND AND WALES

chapter 1|4 pages

CONSENT TO MEDICAL TREATMENT

chapter |3 pages

Breach of confidence

chapter |7 pages

Disclosure in the public interest

chapter |11 pages

Quasi-legislation

chapter 3|2 pages

ABORTION

chapter |2 pages

Moral stances on abortion

chapter |2 pages

The BMA view on abortion

chapter |34 pages

ABORTION LAW IN THE UK

chapter 4|1 pages

CHILDREN AND HEALTHCARE

chapter |11 pages

FUNCTIONS OF CONSENT

chapter |1 pages

CHILDREN’S RIGHTS

chapter |2 pages

CONCLUSIONS

chapter 5|2 pages

ASSISTED REPRODUCTION AND SURROGACY

chapter |4 pages

Full and partial surrogacy

chapter |4 pages

COMMENT ON SURROGACY

chapter |4 pages

Comment

chapter |2 pages

Re F (1986)

chapter |2 pages

SELECTIVE BIBLIOGRAPHY

chapter |1 pages

Usual practice

chapter |3 pages

Keeping abreast of current developments

chapter |8 pages

Interpretations of the Bolam test

chapter |19 pages

Causation and multiple causes

chapter |1 pages

BACKGROUND TO ORGAN TRANSPLANTATION

ByLEGAL PERSPECTIVES

chapter |3 pages

KEY ETHICAL ISSUES

chapter |1 pages

FETAL TRANSPLANTATION

chapter |4 pages

THE ANENCEPHALIC BABY AND BRAIN DEATH

chapter |2 pages

Assisting suicide

chapter |5 pages

The permanent vegetative state

part |2 pages

PART II: COMPARATIVE PERSPECTIVES

chapter |2 pages

Canterbury v Spence (1972)

chapter |1 pages

A BRITISH COMPARATIVE EXCURSUS

ByCANADA AUSTRALIA

chapter |6 pages

CANADA

chapter |11 pages

AN AUSTRALIAN-AMERICAN COMPARISON

ByNEW ZEALAND

chapter |5 pages

Disclosure required by statute

chapter |9 pages

Furniss v Fitchett [1958] NZLR 396

chapter |4 pages

The United Kingdom

chapter |11 pages

The Mueller and Infant Doe cases

chapter 13|2 pages

ABORTION: A GLOBAL OVERVIEW AND

ByCOMPARATIVE STUDY

chapter |8 pages

To save the woman’s life

chapter |7 pages

State medical association regulations

chapter |1 pages

Sweden

chapter |4 pages

India

chapter 14|4 pages

SURROGACY AND REPRODUCTIVE TECHNOLOGY

chapter |10 pages

American surrogacy cases

chapter |5 pages

Surrogacy legislation in Australia

chapter |10 pages

CIVIL LAW COUNTRIES

chapter |9 pages

Canada

chapter |7 pages

Australian legislation

chapter |1 pages

Comment on the German Carership Law

chapter |1 pages

Italy

chapter |2 pages

DEGREE OF CARE OWED

chapter 17|1 pages

ORGAN DONATION AND ORGAN TRANSPLANTATION

ByCOMPARATIVE PERSPECTIVES

chapter |4 pages

ETHICAL PRINCIPLES

chapter |13 pages

Belgium

chapter |1 pages

Living donors

chapter |19 pages

The Turkish law

chapter |21 pages

The USA

chapter 3|5 pages

ABORTION

chapter |5 pages

PVS patients

chapter |5 pages

Ethical aspects of cloning

chapter |12 pages

TEENAGERS