ABSTRACT

Cultural identity is a key area of debate in contemporary Europe. Despite widespread use of the past in the construction of ethnic, national and European identity, theories of cultural identity have been neglected in archaeology. Focusing on the interrelationships between concepts of cultural identity today and the interpretation of past cultural groups, Cultural Identity and Archaeology offers proactive archaeological perspectives in the debate surrounding European identities.

This fascinating and thought-provoking book covers three key areas. It considers how material remains are used in the interpretation of cultural identities, for example ‘pan-Celtic culture’ and ‘Bronze Age Europe’. Finally, it looks at archaeological evidence for the construction of cultural identities in the European past.

The authors are critical of monolithic constructions of Europe, and also of the ethnic and national groups within it. in place of such exclusive cultural, political and territorial entities the book argues for a consideration of the diverse, hybrid and multiple nature of European cultural identities.

chapter 7|9 pages

One Europe - one past?

chapter |6 pages

Introduction

chapter |1 pages

Conclusion

chapter |1 pages

Notes

chapter |6 pages

Bibliography

chapter 11|12 pages

Celts and politics

chapter |1 pages

Introduction

chapter |5 pages

The Iron Age in Europe

chapter |1 pages

Contemporary Celts

chapter |5 pages

Acknowledgements