ABSTRACT

Focused on understanding the journey of international doctoral and early career scholars, this key book provides insight and guidance for those whose country of origin differs from where they have chosen to pursue a doctorate. Drawing on the experiences of PhD students, it harnesses invaluable insights to support a deepening appreciation of a chosen subject of study, manage research and make the most of what intercultural interactions can offer within a doctoral experience.

Each carefully considered part uses research-informed evidence drawn from a wide range of experiences and observations, providing various, and, at times, contrasting perspectives. This book has been written to:

  • offer new insights into the PhD abroad experience
  • equip international scholars for their doctoral journey
  • help the reader optimise institutional support with help from supervisors and other staff members.

Filled with evidence-informed suggestions and advice, this book offers support to doctoral scholars and early career researchers as they navigate their international doctoral journey.

The ‘Insider Guides to Success in Academia’ offers support and practical advice to doctoral students and early-career researchers. Covering the topics that really matter, but which often get overlooked, this indispensable series provides practical and realistic guidance to address many of the needs and challenges of trying to operate, and remain, in academia.

These neat pocket guides fill specific and significant gaps in current literature. Each book offers insider perspectives on the often implicit rules of the game – the things you need to know but usually aren’t told by institutional postgraduate support, researcher development units, or supervisors – and will address a practical topic that is key to career progression. They are essential reading for doctoral students, early-career researchers, supervisors, mentors, or anyone looking to launch or maintain their career in academia.

    1. Socialised learning, academic acculturation and Self-Determination Theory: An intersection of conceptual frameworks;  2. Expecting the unexpected in a PhD and beyond – scholars’ aspirations, the PhD genre and socialised learning experiences; 3.  In the midst of two or more academic cultures; 4.  Self-Determination Theory: One theory to rule them all; 5.  Interacting factors in understanding a metacognitive approach to learning, motivation and intercultural relations; 6.  A metacognitive approach to learning, motivation and intercultural relations: A new model for international doctoral scholars; 7.  Managing, harnessing and promoting positive intercultural engagement