ABSTRACT

The chapter contributes with decolonial perspectives on south Saami history, indigeneity and territorial rights in the Røros area of Norway. Through literature review and storytelling informed by indigenous methodologies, Fjellheim critically addresses colonial narratives of the south Saami through her own family’s history and struggle for rights to practice reindeer herding. Fjellheim argues that the academic depictions of the south Saami during the late 1800s and 1900s as racially inferior immigrants have severe implications for the legal status and practice of Saami reindeer herding and discourses around indigenous peoples’ rights. Yet, the counterstories of south Saami scholars and knowledge holders continue to challenge colonial legacies in academia, public debates and in the justice system.