ABSTRACT

This chapter examines whether individuals who have experienced racial discrimination from police are more likely to adopt the street code, and whether this relationship is more robust across different neighborhood-level factors, using two waves of data from 763 African-American adolescents. It offers support for Elijah Anderson's arguments, using multilevel modeling techniques. The chapter explores that perception of police discrimination is significantly related to adopting the street code. In addition, this relationship was conditioned by neighborhood-level violence. It draws on Anderson's salient discussion on codes of violence, and assesses two hypotheses. The chapter hypothesizes that individuals who have experienced racial discrimination from the police are more likely to adopt the street code, net of individual and neighborhood-level factors. Second, it hypothesizes that the relationship between experiencing police discrimination and adopting the street code will be conditioned by neighborhood characteristics.