ABSTRACT

John White has defended the promotion of national sentiment as an educational aim that is compatible with liberal democracy. Cosmopolitan accounts of justice argue that moral and political duties are not confined to compatriots; they are global in scope and require a more equal global distribution of education. Central to Miller's challenge to cosmopolitan theories of justice is his assertion that questions of global justice cannot be assumed to be questions of social justice with a wider scope. In the context of an extended and complex account of national responsibility, Miller acknowledges the extent of global material inequality as well as unequal civil liberties and political rights. Miller highlights the complexities involved in allocating remedial responsibilities for global poverty. For Nagel duties of justice are restricted to relations within a state; justice is owed to fellow members of the political community, while relations to persons outside the political community are governed by 'minimal humanitarian morality.