ABSTRACT

Cooperation........................................................................................ 506 15.4 The Grand Compromise: Extradite or Prosecute............................ 507 15.5 Four Rationales for Not Extraditing................................................. 510 15.6 Foreign Prosecution and Its Discontents ......................................... 511 15.7 Legal Vacuums and Alternatives to the Extradite-or-Prosecute

Choice ................................................................................................. 513 15.8 International Migration and Fugitives ............................................. 514 15.9 Criminal Justice Vacuums, Desperate Victims, and Self-Help........ 516 15.10 Rewards, Bounty Hunting, and International Relations ................. 518 15.11 Terrorism, Extraordinary Rendition, and Torture........................... 520 15.12 Conclusions ........................................................................................ 522 References ...................................................................................................... 524

On April 29, 2002, Los Angeles County Deputy Sheriff David March pulled over a vehicle in Irwindale, California. While attempting to pat down the driver, Armando Garcia, he was shot in the chest by Garcia, who then fled to Mexico. Garcia had been deported three times for drug charges and was wanted for two other murder charges. Because California has the death penalty, Mexico refused to extradite him. In her plea before a Congressional

committee examining the extradition process, Deputy March’s widow, Teri, expressed her frustration and outrage that Garcia was known to be living freely in Mexico. She wanted justice to be done. Remarkably, she alluded to a well-known alternative to extradition, abduction by bounty hunters, and suggested that it was worth considering (March 2003).