ABSTRACT

The tremor in the web which Gatens described is that active intervention into history which yields a future as yet unknown. However, this open-ended futurity is neither a function of abstractions nor of utopian dreams, but the emergent potential arising from working through the past and present as practices and not as fixed histories or static objects – as ‘blueprints’, already provided. Working in this way questions the place of time in history and subjectivity, seeing their interaction as located, material and aesthetic, rather than pre-determined and simply representative.