ABSTRACT

This chapter describes material the question of transnational dynamics and their inscription within childhoods, by engaging with the transnational biography of a child refugee, Marion Daltrop. It highlights the relational and emotional ties that produce analysis of children, childhood, and those who were once children but are no more, as personal as well as institutionally and politically structured, but not absolutely determined. This chapter is also necessarily explicitly reflexive and geopolitically located, so also highlighting the relational and emotional ties that produce analysis of children, childhood, and those who were once children but are no more, as personal as well as institutionally and politically structured, but not absolutely determined. It arises from personal-political associations, which, in turn, recapitulate methodological – including reflexive and ethical – questions posed by the study of childhood generally, and (in this case) British childhoods in particular.