ABSTRACT

The almost inexhaustible subject of 'transference' has recently been dealt with in the Journal by W. Stekel in a descriptive manner. There are analysts who would not see transference as inevitably arising in the analytic situation. Sigmund Freud himself maintained that patients with too much narcissism would not be able to develop a transference relationship with an analyst. Although transference may be the preferred form of resistance in that it has both a defensive and a gratifying aspect, several writers have maintained that with some types of patients, there are strong resistances to the expression of transference. The notion that transference is the greatest difficulty for the analyst was a challenging lesson for Freud to learn. Every beginner in psychoanalysis probably feels alarmed at first at the difficulties in store for him when he comes to interpret the patient's associations and deal with the reproduction of repressed material.