ABSTRACT

This conclusion presents some closing thoughts on the concepts covered in the preceding chapters of this book. The book begins with the claim that English witchcraft has for too long been viewed as a predominantly malefic crime. To re-evaluate the role of the Devil in English witchcraft, it analyses all sixty-six extant early modern English witchcraft pamphlets. In attempting to re-evaluate the role of the Devil in English witchcraft beliefs, the book argues that witchcraft pamphlets did not present one clear concept of the Devil. It discusses the Devil's appearance as a familiar spirit has been of the utmost importance. The book highlights both how pamphleteers may have manipulated witchcraft narratives but also suggests that we can hear the voice of the witch in many of these stories. It argues that the role of the Devil was of paramount importance in early modern English witchcraft pamphlets.