ABSTRACT

The sexual and social confusion of the farce seems to bleed over into the film's next scene, into the serious business of the courtroom. Sir John's detective work reinstates important social boundaries, particularly the boundary between masculinity and femininity, affirmed at last in the apparent triumph of clear-cut heterosexual love. This triumph is the culmination of a whole series of triumphs for Sir John, who, because he is so threatened by the loss of mastery and control, must be shown to be superior in a number of different respects. In order to reinstate the sexual polarities that Fane threatens to 'neutralize'. It argues that narrative closure puts an end to this play which has all along implicated the male artist in the process of feminization, possible to argue that masculinity, heterosexuality, truth, and justice ultimately prevail over that which has blocked and opposed.